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Why and How the Global Diaspora Should Advocate for the Development of their Nations



To advocate for something is to plead or argue in favor of that thing. People and organizations usually advocate for causes they care for. For instance, to push their agendas forward, several nations, institutions, and organizations hire professionals that advocate on their behalf for things critical to their well-being (e.g. security, economy, politics, and development). Why does diaspora advocacy  for development matter?

 

While almost every country has an interest in others, millions of people are moving every year to new countries or places without being really engaged in the development of their home country as it should. At the same time, the potential of the diaspora is usually ignored even in their new country of residence. With the globalization of the world’s economy and the increasing human migration, the potential of the global diaspora is needed more than ever.

 

Usually, because they know more about their country of residence than their fellow citizens living in their home country, the global Diaspora can better advocate for their people at key institutions or places in their country of residence. By doing so, advocacy service providers will have a channel to reach the customers that were unknown to them, whereas the Diasporas and their people will finally know who to talk to and how to solve their advocacy problems based on their respective realities.

 

Each country should have advocacy centers where they should be training and educating their diaspora in helping them carry their developmental agendas. Governmental agencies (e.g. consulates and embassies) should be highly involved in this kind of advocacy initiatives. Unfortunately, the consulates and embassies of many developing countries are mostly known for delivering visas and passports or for negotiating deals that can be better won if their diaspora can be tactically more involved! Several intellectuals living in the diaspora have complained that they never receive a letter or a newsletter from the embassy or the consulate of their country trying to engage them in development conversations. Therefore, the potential of these diaspora pundits is ignored by their own nations that nominate unqualified diplomats to negotiate very complex issues that they (the diplomats) were not trained for. At the same time, the international diaspora neglect to make the first move by approaching their country to start discussions that can develop them.

 

Normally, in every country, there should be advocacy institutes at least at university levels to help harvest the potential of the professionals in the diaspora as a positive force that can enlighten people and unleash development. By doing so, more advocacy for development jobs can be created in each country and also among the diaspora. The educated people living in the diaspora must be motivated to know that their country of origin needs them no less than their current country of residence where they are sometimes strategically forced to pay a lot for their education and integration before starting to pay a high interest for their loans without forgetting their taxes!

 

Want to find Diaspora Opportunities with Governments? Sign today at www.DiasporaEngager.com/miniRegister

Want to find Diaspora Opportunities with Governments? Sign today at www.DiasporaEngager.com/miniRegister

This is part of the noble mission DiasporaEngager is carrying: brings together the advocacy industry and the Diasporas as well as their home country to cooperate and resolve their problems. In addition, DiasporaEngager can assist you if you are interested in opportunities related to:

  • Advocacy campaign
  • Advocacy law or lawyer
  • Advocacy mediation
  • Advocacy networking
  • Advocacy organization
  • Advocacy program and services
  • Advocacy support and training
  • Consumer advocacy
  • Diaspora advocacy
  • Educational advocacy
  • Human rights advocacy
  • Immigrant advocacy
  • Etc.

Do you have an agenda that you need to push forward?

Do you want to plea the cause of your country?

Do you know that your Diaspora can do the same thing for you?

Do you have any advocacy skills you want to use for any country?

Do you want to advocate on behalf of your country of origin or residence?

Do you want to represent your country somewhere?

 

If you said yes to any of the above questions, you can solve your problem and/or help someone else use your skills by just connecting with people and opportunities on DiasporaEngager: https://DiasporaEngager.com

 

All it takes to start using the diaspora advocacy platform is to register a free account. If you are not a DiasporaEngager User yet, please click here to register today: https://DiasporaEngager.com/miniRegister. It is free!

 

If you already have an account with DiasporaEngager, please log in today (www.DiasporaEngager.com) and post your consulting needs and/or offers.

 

To start receiving updates and opportunities related to the global diaspora engagement, please click here to subscribe to our newsletter today or go to https://diasporaengager.com/Newsletter! It is free!

 

For any questions or suggestions, please contact us

 

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 We wish you the best!

 

 



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Why the Global Diaspora Engagement Platform was Created? – Part 1



What is DiasporaEngager?

DiasporaEngager is the world’s premier and largest Diaspora network that addresses problems related to brain drain, education, business, philanthropy, traveling, immigration, volunteering, and much more. Usually, Diaspora refers to people who are living in a country or town that is not their place of origin/ancestry or the place they call home. Most people can be remotely linked to a country of ancestry, and because our services relate to everybody, “Diaspora” as used here applies to any human being.

 

Why the Global Diaspora Engagement Platform was created?

Millions of people are leaving their home country to go to others countries each year. Even within a country, many people are moving all the time, seeking better opportunities, or trying to adjust to life’s challenges and solicitations. The situation has been worsening in developing countries in a way that the brain drain is seen as one of the greatest threats against their development. Nevertheless, some developed countries are promoting policies and immigration laws that encourage foreign educated pundits or talented graduate students to leave their home country and come to those developed countries where they are “maintained” after graduation. So far, the efforts to stop or properly manage brain drain have been unsuccessful.

 

Unfortunately, many people are usually disappointed by what they see after moving, and others are disconnected from people and opportunities in their home country as well as in their host country. In other situations, people travel to new places without having a contact that can assist or mentor them if a need arises. Because of a lack of information or right connections, several aliens and travelers do not produce the best of themselves or successfully integrate to their new environment. Those who succeed often don’t collaborate/network with the newly arriving immigrants or with those who are not reaching their dreams.

 

Besides money they send back to their relatives, the global Diasporas do not contribute to the development of their country of origin as wished. Those who want to engage in humanitarian, fundraising, or philanthropy activities to give back don’t know how, where, and whom to contact to reach the real needy or to solve the real problems. At the same time, the Diasporas are usually unknown by many businesses, nonprofits and other organizations that can help them in their country of residence. This global problem impoverishes nations and deprives many organizations from reaching most of their potential market, clients, and customers.

 

With the increasing rise of crises, wars, and catastrophic events around the globe, human migration will keep growing and its corresponding problems will get worse if appropriate actions are not taken now. To sustainably solve this problem, a global system must be built where the Diaspora, the people and organizations in their country of origin and in their host country can work together to help each other mutually. That’s what DiasporaEngager was created for!

To register to DiasporaEngager in order to start using the platform to address your problems or help others, please click here: https://diasporaengager.com/miniRegister.php.

 

You can also join our Newsletter list today by clicking here.

 

About the Founder of DiasporaEngager

DiasporaEngager was founded by Roland Holou, a dual citizen of the US and Benin (West Africa). Prior to founding this company, Roland worked as a Plant Biotechnology Research Scientist in the USA. He also served as the International Chair of the “Sweet Sorghum Ethanol Association”. He also chaired the “International Service in Agronomy Award Committee” at the American Society of Agronomy. Roland Holou obtained his Ph.D. in Plant, Insect and Microbial Sciences at the University of Missouri in Columbia (USA), where he graduated as the Doctoral Marshal. He also holds a Bachelor Degree in Agronomy and a Master of Science Degree in Agricultural Engineering. He authored several books related to Sociology, Leadership, Education, Development, Politics, and Economics. Roland is available for interviews, consultations, and conferences related to his area of expertise including the international diaspora engagement and brain drain management.

 

Thank you very much for taking your time to read us.

 

In our next blog, we will share with you how DiasporaEngager can help individuals, organizations, and nations.

Stay tuned.



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What is our Definition of Diaspora?



Welcome to Diaspora Engagement Blog !

We are very excited you chose to visit our blog.

On this blog, powered by Diaspora Engagement ® (aka DiasporaEngager), you will learn about and interact with the international Diasporas.

Before we start blogging about more serious topics, let’s make sure that we all have the same understanding of the term “Diaspora”.

 

Our Definition of Diaspora

In our context, the word Diaspora is referring to anyone who, for any reasons, is living in a country or town that is not his or her place of origin or ancestry or the place s/he calls home. Some people may call them an immigrant, a stranger, or an alien. Some may argue that, most individuals can be remotely linked to a country of origin different than their current country of residence, and therefore, most of us are an alien, immigrant, or a Diaspora of somewhere. In the US for instance, except the native Indians, everyone else can be considered an alien or immigrant. Even in that case, the Indians themselves have had to migrate from somewhere before reaching the US. The longer the duration of the stay of someone in a foreign land, the higher the likelihood that his or her descendants think that they (the descendants) are native of that place that their ancestry moved to long ago. That’s why, because they are not first, second, or third generation immigrant, many people easily forget that they are a stranger of what they call “our land”, and unfortunately treat the new immigrants like the “bad people” or like “those who are taking our lands or our country”, or like “those who don’t even speak our language well”, or like “those who don’t behave like us”. In reality, those new immigrants (new arrivals) are usually just trying to go through the obligatory survival and integration steps that the ancestors of those who are calling them “strangers” and who think they are native did long ago. Therefore, without entering into any political and demographic debates, the word “Diaspora” as used in our context can be applied to any human being.

In our future posts, we will give you more details about who we are and what we do, and how we may help you.  The Diaspora Engagement platform, DiasporaEngager.com, allow you to learn about the international diaspora and ways you can engage with them locally or worldwide.

 

To register to DiasporaEngager in order to start using the platform to address your problems or help others, please click here: https://diasporaengager.com/miniRegister.php.

 

You can also join our Newsletter list today by clicking here.

 

For any question related to this blog or to the Diaspora Engagement services, please contact us at blog@DiasporaEngager.com.

 

Thank you for visiting our blog. Please stay tuned.